Posts tagged ‘video’

May 6, 2010

A pinhole.

by Savvy

I have become interested in pinhole cameras. I watched my friend build a giant one around 5 years ago, but never looked into them.

When I was younger I owned (and still do) an old school standard film camera and a polaroid cam. My film camera takes fantastic pictures, albeit ‘standard’; no fancy options, no zoom, not very good at night. The polaroids didn’t fascinate me as much as I expected, apart from a few, (possibly because the machine was new) so I experimented with them, manipulated them, played with them. When I got my first digital camera I decided I didn’t much care for pixels and prefered film. When I got an upgrade a few years later, this resonated even more. More fancy options, more pixels. No atmosphere. Not unless I added some on photoshop. And even then, the atmosphere was digital. I prefer something I can touch, something more playful. A roll of film. Negatives. A polaroid I can rip apart while it develops and transfer it onto another surface. Years later, I got my first camera with manual film advance winding and discovered the amazingness of multiple exposures. Different coloured flashes. Naughty amouts of sunlight that creep into the internals and splash my film. Still, I was not yet completely satisfied. I then bought my first old camera [circa 1949-1961] in an antiques market in Rotterdam and I was not disappointed. The photographs taken ooze atmosphere, light and shadow.

I don’t care for new machines. I care for old things. Things that have been through time, that have signs of this, marks of history that appear. I am not a collector and I don’t want to be a collector. I don’t want to admire my findings from the outside of a glass cabinet. I want to use them.

Last summer I acquired an old 8mm cine camera [circa 1966-68] in an antiques shop in Prague. It was an experience in itself, perusing the 1x3m shop for 2 hours after which the owner, Martin, decided he liked us and my interest in his cameras enough to open up his favourite ones, let us have a play, and show us his camping photographs (ones he had taken with one of the cameras). Out he came from behind the curtain holding bunches of photos and wine glasses. He told us, as he refilled our glasses sometime later, that he’d bought this bottle in hope of sharing it with the beautiful new girl working in the bookshop next door.

We spent the only money we had left on this cine camera, on our way to the airport. Martin gave us a good deal. I have yet to find film for it but I am hoping it will be my most exciting camera experience yet. And will send Martin a souvenir.

But until that time comes…

I have a) been given an indefinite loan present of an old camera from my M. which belongs to his great-uncle.
And, to reiterate the first sentence of this entry, have b) become interested in pinhole cameras.

I have been inspired by this: or, rather, her:


© Katie Cooke

heyoka‘ has made a pinhole camera out of an old Christmas card box. Its results are beautiful, transient, moving pictures. Imperfect captures of a realistic image, but perfect scenes in time. The beauty lies between the perfect and imperfect, that is the true reality, with a touch of something different. There is no lens, no machinery, just honesty.

NB. See more of her photography work here. A little advertisement never hurt anyone.

Who needs a lens when you can make pictures with cardboard boxes, paper negatives or sheet film, and endlessly long exposures?
It’s all about slow light and the spaces between stillness. Except when it’s not
“.

December 15, 2009

House of Cards.

by Savvy

Who knows what the inside of Thom Yorke’s face looks like?
I do!

My new toy. Playing with data + Radiohead = Amazing.

Just press play.

aaronkoblin – the King.
or play on google code.
watch the making and other
and if you don’t like playing(weirdo), just watch the video.

“Just data”.

No cameras or lights were used. Instead two technologies were used to capture 3D images:Geometric Informatics and Velodyne LIDAR. Geometric Informatics scanning systems produce structured light to capture 3D images at close proximity, while a Velodyne Lidar system that uses multiple lasers is used to capture large environments such as landscapes. In this video, 64 lasers rotating and shooting in a 360 degree radius 900 times per minute produced all the exterior scenes”.

Data. The global archive.


In the same way that a photograph is a memory, so is a video or a movie shot from certain angles. If you were trying to figure out what was slightly to the left of the object or person you recorded, you probably wouldn’t be able to; because you wouldn’t know. Maybe you didn’t notice or maybe you just forgot. Or maybe the footage that contained that information didn’t make the final cut.

When you remember your dreams, my boyfriend claims, you are creating a memory there and then.
Whatever you remember is your memory, that was your dream, that is your movie. If you try to remember something you didn’t see, it probably wasn’t there. Do our eyes take in more than a camera? Or more than a laser? Or more than a sensor? Or is too much information being sent to the brain instantaneously, too many distractions, limited storage space? Are too many things being overlooked?
If the world around us begins to be recorded in data, nothing will be lost. It is not creating a memory, it is re-creating an experience.